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Projects contained in the archive can be searched using the Culture and Threat level filters below. Narrow and widen the time range of Projects displayed by using your mouse or track pad to grab and drag either end of the timeline. Note: some high polycount models may be too heavy to run on mobile devices. We therefore recommend viewing the archive on a notebook or desktop computer for an optimal experience.

Glenbow General Store and Post Office

Glenbow General Store and Post Office

The Glenbow General Store and Post Office operated in the town of Glenbow, Alberta from 1909 until 1918 serving the people of Glenbow and surrounding area. The building itself consisted of a relocated farmhouse and extension to meet the needs of a growing town [7]. After the store closed, the building was used as a granary until the floor collapsed, after which the building was abandoned. The building’s importance to the settlement of the area in the early twentieth century, as well as to the quarry that provided sandstone for several important buildings in Alberta, contribute to its value as a historic resource. Please Note: This is a decimated point cloud of the standing building.

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Brooks Aqueduct

Brooks Aqueduct

The Brooks Aqueduct is a 3.2km long reinforced concrete structure constructed between 1912 and 1914 by the Canadian Pacific Railway Company. The hydrostatic catenary flume design was a unique piece of engineering at the time and is the largest constructed aqueduct of its kind. The aqueduct was part of an irrigation system that allowed the rise of agriculture in southern Alberta in the early 20th Century.

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The Springbank Hill Wind-Pump

The Springbank Hill Wind-Pump

Upon European arrival to North America, windmill technology was quickly adapted to pump well water in order to allow for the settlement of the arid prairie environments. The use of wind-pump technology became a main feature of ranches and farms in the West, with popularity expanding through to the 1930s. The Springbank Hill wind-pump is a prime example of the use of these wind-pumps in the settlement of Alberta. This is a subsampled point cloud of the windmill which as subsequently been demolished.

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North West Mounted Police Barracks, Fort MacLeod

North West Mounted Police Barracks, Fort MacLeod

The North West Mounted Police (NWMP) Barracks, were constructed in 1884 replacing the original fort on MacLeod Island in the Old Man River (Est. 1874) due to flooding [4]. The buildings left of the NWMP Barracks represent the history of the protection of Canadian sovereignty of the West. As the first permanent station of the NWMP in western Canada Fort Macleod’s history is intertwined with the difficult histories of the whiskey trade, Indigenous relations, and European settlement in Southern Alberta. This survey was conducted to assist Alberta Culture and Tourism with the reconstruction and preservation of the harness shop (tag 4 in 3D model).

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McDougall United Memorial Church

McDougall United Memorial Church

The McDougall Memorial United Church is a one-storey building located on the north bank of the Bow River, roughly two kilometres east of Morley. The church was constructed in 1875 in the Carpenter's Gothic style and features pointed arch windows and front door, shingled front-gabled roof, and a central steeple crowned by a pinnacle. The designation also includes the archaeological remains of mission structures at the site. This is a subsampled point cloud of the McDougall Church post-fire.

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Quon Sang Lung Laundry Shop

Quon Sang Lung Laundry Shop

The Quon Sang Lung Laundry in Fort Macleod, Alberta was built in 1907. It was one of three or four similarly constructed buildings in the area of 25th St. and 3rd Ave that comprised Fort Macleod’s Chinatown. The link between businesses such as this to Chinese immigration, settlement and entrepreneurship in Alberta in the early twentieth century contributed to its value as a historic resource.

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Perrenoud Homestead

Perrenoud Homestead

The Perrenoud Homestead is located just north of the town of Cochrane, Alberta. Designated as a provincial heritage site in 1992, the heritage value of the Perrenoud Homestead lies within its link to the establishment of early ranching operations in Alberta in the 1880s and 1890s. Brought to the area in a wave of settlement encouraged by grazing leases in the late 1800s, the homestead was built by Charles Perrenoud who emigrated to Canada from France in 1886 and established his horse ranching operation alongside his brother Earnest. In recent years the original homestead started to collapse. Due to safety concerns, the homestead was dismantled and placed into storage in 2017. This is a decimated point cloud of the Perrenoud Homestead.

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Okotoks Erratic “Big Rock”

Okotoks Erratic “Big Rock”

The Okotoks Erratic, also known as ‘Big Rock’, was dropped by the southward-moving glacier around 10 000-12 000 years ago. The Okotoks Erratic is believed to have originated in Jasper National Park and now currently sits 7-8km West of the Town of Okotoks. The Rock is estimated to weigh 16500 tonnes and has dimensions of 41m by 18m by 9m [1]. The Okotoks Erratic is an important location for many of the First Nation groups in the area, but is often associated with the Blackfoot First Nations and a story of Napi, the supernatural trickster, explaining how the rock got to its current resting place and why the rock is split down the middle.

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Miner’s Cabin

Miner’s Cabin

This wooden cabin is a single room building with a 23.32 m² footprint and was built around 1885. The cabin was original built in Banff, Alberta, but was given to Heritage Park by the Glenbow Foundation in 1964 and added to the park to illustrate the rustic living conditions of the miners who came to the Rocky Mountains searching for gold or other minerals [1].

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Caretaker’s Cabin “Walking Buffalo’s Cabin”

Caretaker’s Cabin “Walking Buffalo’s Cabin”

This cabin is on the site of the McDougall Historical Church and situated to the southwest of the church building. The date of its original construction is unknown. In 1957 it was moved to its current location from the Sarcee Nation Indian Agency on the Tsuu T’Ina reserve southwest of Calgary [1]. The cabin was brought in after the church was renovated and re-purposed as a historical site to be a residence for Walking Buffalo, a Stoney Elder who had lifelong ties to the McDougall Mission [2]. Rather than a rendered 3D model, this is the registered point cloud captured by the Z+F scanner. Please Note: This is a large file and may take a few minutes to load.

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Information Bureau, Waterton Lakes National Park

Information Bureau, Waterton Lakes National Park

The Information Bureau was constructed in 1958 with distinctive stonework on the exterior; the stonework included a false chimney/buttress that was the main entrance to the building [1]. This small (56 m²) single storey structure was built into the hillside to provide a prominent and purpose-built location for the growing number of tourists visiting Waterton Lakes National Park [1]. This building provides an excellent example of International Style architecture that was prominent in the park throughout the 1950s and 60s [1]. This is a subsampled point cloud of what remained of the Visitors Bureau, post fire. The masonry has since been removed from the site.

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Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump

Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump

Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump is a Provincial Heritage Site, National Historic Site, and UNESCO World Heritage Site located in Southwestern Alberta. The significance of this site lies within its historical, archaeological, and scientific value. The archaeological layers of this site indicate use by the Indigenous Plains nations stretching back at least 6,000 years. Head-Smashed-In is one of the oldest, most extensive, and best-preserved examples of a buffalo jump anywhere in the world. Overall, this site and the surrounding landscape is a hugely valuable representation of this traditional hunting method used by Plains Nations until the late 19th century.

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